Captiva Fishing, Spanish Mackerel!

Spanish Mackerel, Inshore, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Tuesday, February 13, 2018.
Spanish Mackerel, Inshore, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Tuesday, February 13, 2018.

Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, February 13, 2018: Spanish Mackerel!

CaptivaRentals.org: Avoid VRBO Fees. Rent Directly From Local Homeowners.Captiva Fishing Report,  Sanibel Island Fishing Charters, Tuesday, February 13: Spanish Mackerel; Catch & Release; water quality in relatively good shape; (Caloosahatchee: no/little freshwater runoff impact right now; Red Tide Report, impact minimal, broken up and largely dispersed); more fishing reports from other areas and Captains below.

Tuesday, February 13, Sanibel Island Fishing Charters: Spanish Mackerel, Catch & Release.  Please also visit the SanibelFort MyersFlorida Fishing Report and Cuban Fishing sites.  Better water moving north of Sanibel up through Captiva & North Captiva.

Please also visit the SanibelFort MyersFlorida Fishing Report and Cuban Fishing sites.  Better water moving north of Sanibel up through Captiva & North Captiva.

Please click here to Book A Charter or call 239-472-8658 and here for Live Sanibel Traffic Cams.

Spanish Mackerel, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Saturday, December 9, [File Photo - Thursday, 10-1-15 ].
Spanish Mackerel, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Saturday, December 9, 2017, [File Photo – Thursday, 10-1-15 ].
“The Atlantic Spanish mackerel (Scomberomorus maculatus) is a migratory species of mackerels that swims to the Northern Gulf of Mexico in spring, returns to South Florida in the Eastern Gulf, and to Mexico in the Western Gulf in the fall.

The fish exhibits a green back; its sides are silvery marked with about three rows of round to elliptical yellow spots. Lateral line gradually curving down from the upper end of the gill cover toward caudal peduncle. The first (spiny) dorsal fin is black at the front. Posterior membranes are white with a black edge. Its single row of cutting edged teeth in each jaw (around sixty-four teeth in all) are large, uniform, closely spaced and flattened from side to side. As with the King mackerel and the Cero mackerel, these teeth look very similar to those of the BluefishPomatomus saltatrix.

Spanish Mackerel, Inshore, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Thursday, June 30, 2016.
Spanish Mackerel, Inshore, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Thursday, June 30, 2016.

Spanish mackerel are a highly valued fish throughout their range from North Carolina to Texas. Recreational anglers catch Spanish mackerel from boats while trolling or drifting and from boats, piers, jetties, and beaches by casting spoons and jigs and live-bait fishing. Fast lure retrieves are key to catching these quick fish. Commercial methods are primarily run-around gill netting, and rarely, by trolling lures similar to those used by recreational anglers.

Spanish Mackerel, Inshore, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sunday, May 29, 2016.
Spanish Mackerel, Inshore, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sunday, May 29, 2016.

On November 4, 1987, Woody Outlaw caught a world-record 13-pound Spanish mackerel[4]on a blue and white Sea Witch with a strip of fastback menhaden on a 7/0 hook, held by a Shimano bait-casting reel on a Kuna rod with 30-pound test line.[5]

Spanish mackerel are primarily marketed fresh or frozen as fillets as commercially caught fish are too small to sell in the form of steaks. Their raw flesh is white. They may be prepared by broilingfryingbaking or, rarely, by smoking.

Spanish Mackerel Fishing, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Friday, April 22, 2016.
Spanish Mackerel Fishing, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Friday, April 22, 2016.

The Spanish mackerel is also a popular sushi fish. By analogy with the Japanese Spanish mackerel, which is a member of the same genus, it is often called sawara on sushi menus.”  Please see more information here.

Spanish Mackerel, 7-29-14, Sanibel & Captiva Islands & Fort Myers Charters & Fishing Guide Service.
Spanish Mackerel, 7-29-14, Sanibel & Captiva Islands & Fort Myers Charters & Fishing Guide Service.

Please click here to Book A Charter or call 239-472-8658 and here for Live Sanibel Traffic Cams.  Tuesday, February 13, Spanish Mackerel, click here for College Of Fishing Hats & Apparel.

We’re located at Castaways Marina, Santiva, Sanibel Island, just before the Blind Pass bridge to Captiva Island.

Fly Fishing, Spanish Mackerel, Sanibel & Captiva Islands & Fort Myers Charters & Fishing Guide Service. Saturday, October 21, 2017, [File Photo: 7-7-14]
Fly Fishing, Spanish Mackerel, Sanibel & Captiva Islands & Fort Myers Charters & Fishing Guide Service. Saturday,
October 21, 2017, [File Photo: 7-7-14]
After a fierce storm, Turner Beach, the beach adjoining the Pass, is frequently covered with a bounty of shells from Olives to Fighting Whelks to the more common Conchs. The fishing is also renowned with sharks in the summer, tailing redfish on the bayside flats and snook under and off the Blind Pass bridge. Because Turner Beach faces Westward, the sunsets are spectacular and a popular viewing point for residents and visitors alike.

Spanish Mackerel, 6-25-14, Sanibel & Captiva Islands & Fort Myers Charters & Fishing Guide Service.
Spanish Mackerel, 6-25-14, Sanibel & Captiva Islands & Fort Myers Charters & Fishing Guide Service.

And you can like us on Facebook.

Fair winds and following seas,

Captain Joey Burnsed ~ please click calendar at the upper left or call 239-472-8658 to book a Sanibel & Captiva Islands, Boca Grande or Fort Myers fishing guide trip or shelling charter.

Spanish Mackerel caught offshore of Captiva on Sanibel & Captiva charters!
Spanish Mackerel caught offshore of Captiva on Sanibel & Captiva charters!

Captiva Fishing, Blacknose!

Blacknose Shark, Inshore, Stealing The Redfish Bait, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Monday, February 12, 2018.
Blacknose Shark, Inshore, Stealing The Redfish Bait, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Monday, February 12, 2018.

Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, February 12, 2018: Blacknose Shark!

CaptivaRentals.org: Avoid VRBO Fees. Rent Directly From Local Homeowners.Captiva Fishing Report,  Sanibel Island Fishing Charters, Monday, February 12: Blacknose Shark, Inshore, Stealing cut bait for the Redfish; Catch & Release; water quality in relatively good shape; (Caloosahatchee: no/little freshwater runoff impact right now; Red Tide Report, impact minimal, broken up and largely dispersed); more fishing reports from other areas and Captains below.

Monday, February 12, Sanibel Island Fishing Charters: Blacknose Shark, Inshore, Cut Bait, Catch & Release.  Please also visit the SanibelFort MyersFlorida Fishing Report and Cuban Fishing sites.  Better water moving north of Sanibel up through Captiva & North Captiva.

Blacknose Shark, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Monday, February 12, 2018, [File Photo: Friday, October 13, 2017].
Blacknose Shark, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Monday, February 12, 2018, [File Photo: Friday, October 13, 2017].
Please also visit the SanibelFort MyersFlorida Fishing Report and Cuban Fishing sites.  Better water moving north of Sanibel up through Captiva & North Captiva.

Please click here to Book A Charter or call 239-472-8658 and here for Live Sanibel Traffic Cams.

 “The blacknose shark (Carcharhinus acronotus) is a species of requiem shark, belonging to the family Carcharhinidae, common in the tropical and subtropical waters of the western Atlantic Ocean. This species generally inhabits coastal seagrass, sand, or rubble habitats, with adults preferring deeper water than juveniles.
Blacknose Shark Fsihing, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Thursday, May 25, 2017.
Blacknose Shark Fishing, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Thursday, May 25, 2017.

A small shark typically measuring 1.3 m (4.3 ft) long, the blacknose has a typical streamlined “requiem shark” shape with a long, rounded snout, large eyes, and a small first dorsal fin. Its common name comes from a characteristic black blotch on the tip of its snout, though this may be indistinct in older individuals.

Blacknose sharks feed primarily on small bony fishes and cephalopods, and in turn fall prey to larger sharks.

Blacknose Shark, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island,Tuesday, May 23, 2017.
Blacknose Shark, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Tuesday, May 23, 2017.

Like other members of their family, they exhibit a viviparous mode of reproduction in which the developing embryos are sustained by a placental connection. The females give birth to three to six young in late spring or early summer, either annually or biennially, after a gestation period of eight to 11 months.

This species is not known to attack humans, though it has been documented performing a threat display towards divers. It is of moderate commercial and recreational importance.

Blacknose Shark, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Wednesday, May 3, 2017.
Blacknose Shark, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Wednesday, May 3, 2017.

The International Union for Conservation of Nature has assessed this species as Near Threatened. In 2009, the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced the populations of the blacknose shark off the United States are being overfished and proposed new conservation measures.

Drawing of a blacknose shark and one of its upper teeth – the arrows and vertical line refer to diagnostic features of the species.

 

The Cuban naturalist Felipe Poey published the first description of the blacknose shark in 1860 as Squalus acronotus, in his Memorias sobre la historia natural de la Isla de Cuba. Later authors moved this species to the genus Carcharhinus. The type specimen was a 98-cm (3.2-ft)-long male caught off Cuba.[2]

Blacknose Shark, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Friday, October 13, 2017, [File Photo: Tuesday, April 11, 2017].
Blacknose Shark, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Friday, October 13, 2017, [File Photo: Tuesday, April 11, 2017].
Based on morphological data, Jack Garrick suggested in 1982 that the blacknose shark has a sister relationship to a group containing the whitecheek shark (C. dussumieri) and the blackspot shark (C. sealei), while Leonard Compagnoproposed in 1988 that this shark belongs in a group with five other species, including the silky shark (C. falciformis) and the blacktip reef shark (C. melanopterus).

Molecular analyses have been similarly equivocal regarding the blacknose shark’s phylogenetic relationships: Gavin Naylor’s 1992 allozyme analysis found this species to be the most bbasal member of Carcharhinus, while Mine Dosay-Abkulut’s 2008 ribosomal DNA analysis indicated affinity between it and the blacktip shark (C. limbatus) or the smalltail shark (C. porosus).[3][4] The whitenose shark (Nasolamia velox), found along the tropical western coast of the Americas, may be descended from blacknose sharks that experienced the teratogenic effects of incipient cyclopia.[2]

Blacknose Shark, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Saturday, March 25, 2017.
Blacknose Shark, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Saturday, March 25, 2017.

The blacknose shark inhabits the continental and insular shelves off the eastern coast of the Americas, as far north as North Carolina and as far south as southern Brazil, including the Bahamas, the Gulf of Mexico, and the Caribbean Sea.

They frequent coastal waters over beds of seagrass, sandy flats, and shell or coral rubble.[5]This species is spatially segregated by size and sex. Generally, only young sharks are encountered in shallow water, as the adults prefer depths greater than 9 m (30 ft) and are most common at 18–64 m (59–210 ft).[1][6]

Blacknose Shark, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Saturday, September 3, 2016.
Blacknose Shark, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Saturday, September 3, 2016.

Blacknose sharks in the South Atlantic Bight (off the Atlantic coast of the southern United States) migrate northward in the summer and southward (or possibly offshore) in the winter; a similar migration occurs for sharks in the Gulf of Mexico.[7]

The blacknose shark has a slender, streamlined body with a long, rounded snout and large eyes. There is a well-developed flap of skin in front of each nostril, defining the inflow and outflow openings. Twelve to 13 and 11 to 12 tooth rows occur on either side of the upper and lower jaws, respectively, with one or two teeth at the symphysis (middle). The teeth are triangular and oblique, with serrated edges; the upper teeth are stouter than the lower teeth. The five pairs of gill slits are short, measuring less a third the length of the first dorsal fin base.[6][8]

Blacknose Shark, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Wednesday, August 31, 2016.
Blacknose Shark, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Wednesday, August 31, 2016.

The first dorsal fin is small and somewhat sickle-shaped, with a pointed apex and a short, free, rear tip; its origin lies over the free rear tips of the pectoral fins. The second dorsal fin is relatively large, though still less than half the height of the first. No ridge is seen between the dorsal fins.

The pectoral fins are short and tapered.[8]The body is covered with overlapping dermal denticles that bear five to seven longitudinal ridges (three in very young individuals) leading to three to five marginal teeth.[6]

Blacknose Shark, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Thursday, August 11, 2016.
Blacknose Shark, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Thursday, August 11, 2016.

The coloration is yellowish to greenish-gray or brown above and white to yellow below. A distinctive dark blotch at the tip of the snout is most obvious in young sharks. The tips of the second dorsal fin, upper caudal fin lobe, and sometimes the lower caudal fin lobe, are dark.

Blacknose sharks are typically 1.3–1.4 m (4.3–4.6 ft) long and 10 kg (22 lb) in weight.[2][8] The maximum length and weight of record is 2.0 m (6.6 ft) and 18.9 kg (42 lb), respectively.[9]

Blacknose Shark, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Friday, July 29, 2016.
Blacknose Shark, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Friday, July 29, 2016.

A small, fast-swimming predator, the blacknose shark feeds primarily on small, bony fishes, including pinfishcroakersporgiesanchoviesspiny boxfish, and porcupinefish, as well as on octopus and other cephalopods.[6]

When competing for bait, their speed allows them to snatch food from larger sharks such as the Caribbean reef shark (C. perezi).[10][11]

Blacknose Shark, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Monday, July 18, 2016.
Blacknose Shark, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Monday, July 18, 2016.

This species may form large schools that are sometimes associated with anchovies and mullet.[6] Blacknose sharks demonstrate a high degree of philopatry: both juveniles and adults have been documented returning to the same local area year after year.[12]

Blacknose sharks are preyed upon by larger sharks,[6] and captives have been observed to perform an apparent threat display towards encroaching divers or newly introduced members of their species. The display consists of the shark hunching its back, lowering its pectoral fins, gaping its jaws, and swimming with an exaggerated side-to-side motion.[2][13]

Blacknose Shark, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Saturday, July 16, 2016.
Blacknose Shark, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Saturday, July 16, 2016.

Known parasites of this species include the copepods Nesippus orientalisPerissopus dentatusPandarus sinuatusKroyeria sphyrnaeNemesis atlantica, and Eudactylina spinifera,[14] as well as tapeworms in the genera Paraorygmatobothrium and Platybothrium.[15][16]

As in other requiem sharks, the blacknose shark is viviparous: after the developing embryos exhaust their supply of yolk, the empty yolk sac develops into a placental connection through which the mother provides nourishment.

Blacknose Shark, Inshore, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Tuesday, July 12, 2016.
Blacknose Shark, Inshore, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Tuesday, July 12, 2016.

Off the United States, males are thought to reproduce every year, while females reproduce every other year.[17] However, off northeastern Brazil, the female reproductive cycle is short enough to occur annually.[1][18]

Vitellogenesis (the formation of yolk within the ovary) occurs in the late summer, and is immediately followed by mating and fertilization in the fall, with the young being born the following spring to summer.[6] The seasonality of these events means the reproductive cycle is offset by six months between populations in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres.

Man Bites Shark, Blacknose Sharks, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Tuesday, June 28, 2016.
Man Bites Shark, Blacknose Sharks, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Tuesday, June 28, 2016.

The gestation period has been variously estimated at eight months off northeastern Brazil and 9–11 months off the southeastern United States.[18]

Females typically give birth to litters of one to six pups in shallow nursery areas, such as coastal bays or mangrove swamps;[1][19] one known nursery area is Bulls Bay off South Carolina.[6] There is no relationship between female size and the number of young.[7] The newborns measure 38–50 cm (15–20 in) long.[2]

Blacknose Shark, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Friday, June 3, 2016.
Blacknose Shark, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Friday, June 3, 2016.

Female blacknose sharks grow more slowly, attain a larger ultimate size, and have a longer lifespan than males. In addition, Gulf of Mexico sharks are slower-growing and longer-lived than those from the South Atlantic Bight.[20]

In the South Atlantic Bight, both sexes mature at a fork length (from snout tip to caudal fin fork) of around 90 cm (3.0 ft), corresponding to ages of 4.3 years for males and 4.5 years for females. In the Gulf of Mexico, both sexes mature at a fork length of around 85 cm (2.79 ft), corresponding to ages of 5.4 years for males and 6.6 years for females.[7] The maximum lifespan has been calculated as 19 years in South Atlantic Bight and 16.5 years in the Gulf of Mexico.[1]

Blacknose Shark, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sunday, May 22, 2016.
Blacknose Shark, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sunday, May 22, 2016.

The blacknose shark has never been implicated in an attack on humans. However, caution should be exercised if it begins to perform a threat display.[19]

This species is regarded as a game fish and offers a respectable fight on light tackle (a more delicate fishing line).[6] It is also of regional commercial importance, being taken intentionally and as bycatch via gillnets and surface longlines across its range, most significantly off southwestern FloridaVenezuela, and Brazil; the meat is sold dried and salted.

Blacknose Shark, Inshore, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Thursday, May 19, 2016.
Blacknose Shark, Inshore, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Thursday, May 19, 2016.

Large numbers of blacknose sharks are also caught incidentally by shrimp trawlers, which may pose a greater threat to its population, as many of the sharks taken are immature.[1][2]

Off the United States, the fishing of the blacknose shark is regulated by the U.S. National Marine Fisheries Service 1993 Fisheries Management Plan (FMP) for Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico sharks.

Blacknose Shark , Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Monday, May 16, 2016.
Blacknose Shark , Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Monday, May 16, 2016.

For the purposes of commercial quotas and bag limits, the blacknose shark is classified within the “small coastal shark” (SCS) complex.[7] From 1999 to 2005, an average of 27,484 blacknose sharks (62 metric tons) were caught each year off the United States.

Recent stock assessments conducted by the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) have determined the populations of this species have become overfished in both the Atlantic and the Gulf of Mexico.

Blacknose Shark, Inshore, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Thursday, April 7, 2016 ~ #Sanibel #Captiva.
Blacknose Shark, Inshore, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Thursday, April 7, 2016, ~ #Sanibel #Captiva.

In 2009, the NOAA proposed instituting a separate quota for blacknose sharks of 6,065 sharks per year, and a ban on using gill nets to catch sharks in the Atlantic.[21]

By contrast, blacknose shark stocks off northern Brazil appear to be stable, while no fishery data are available from the Caribbean. The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) has assessed this species as Near Threatened globally.[1]  Please see the source and more information here.

Blacknose Shark, Inshore, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sunday, April 3, 2016 ~ #Sanibel #Captiva.
Blacknose Shark, Inshore, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sunday, April 3, 2016 ~ #Sanibel #Captiva.

Please click here to Book A Charter or call 239-472-8658 and here for Live Sanibel Traffic Cams.  Monday, February 12, Blacknose Shark, stealing cut bait for Redfish, click here for College Of Fishing Hats & Apparel.

We’re located in Castaways Marina, Santiva, Sanibel Island, just before the Blind Pass bridge to Captiva Island.

Blacknose Shark, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Tuesday, March 29, 2016 ~ #Sanibel #Captiva.
Blacknose Shark, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Tuesday, March 29, 2016 ~ #Sanibel #Captiva.

After a fierce storm, Turner Beach, the beach adjoining the Pass, is frequently covered with a bounty of shells from Olives to Fighting Whelks to the more common Conchs. The fishing is also renowned with sharks in the summer, tailing redfish on the bayside flats and snook under and off the Blind Pass bridge. Because Turner Beach faces Westward, the sunsets are spectacular and a popular viewing point for residents and visitors alike.

Blacknose Reef Shark, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Monday, March 28, 2016 ~ #Sanibel #Captiva.
Blacknose Reef Shark, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Monday, March 28, 2016, ~ #Sanibel #Captiva.

And you can like us on Facebook.

Fair winds and following seas,

Captain Joey Burnsed ~ please click calendar at the upper right or call 239-472-8658 to book a Sanibel & Captiva Islands, Boca Grande or Fort Myers fishing guide trip or shelling charter.

Captiva Fishing, Atlantic Sharpnose Shark, 4-28-15, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing & Fort Myers Fishing Charters & Guide Service.
Captiva Fishing, Atlantic Sharpnose Shark, 4-28-15, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing & Fort Myers Fishing Charters & Guide Service.

Captiva Fishing, SeaTrout!

SeaTrout, Grass Beds & Oyster Bars, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Sunday, February 11, 2018.
SeaTrout, Grass Beds & Oyster Bars, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Sunday, February 11, 2018.

Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, February 11, 2018: SeaTrout!

CaptivaRentals.org: Avoid VRBO Fees. Rent Directly From Local Homeowners.Captiva Fishing Report,  Sanibel Island Fishing Charters, Sunday, February 11: SeaTrout, Grass Flats, Catch & Release; water quality in relatively good shape; (Caloosahatchee: no/little freshwater runoff impact right now; Red Tide Report, impact minimal, broken up and largely dispersed); more fishing reports from other areas and Captains below.

Sunday, February 11, Sanibel Island Fishing Charters: SeaTrout, Grass Flats & Oyster Bars, Catch & Release.  Please also visit the SanibelFort MyersFlorida Fishing Report and Cuban Fishing sites.  Better water moving north of Sanibel up through Captiva & North Captiva.

Big SeaTrout, Grass Beds & Oyster Bars, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Thursday, February 9, 2018.
Big SeaTrout, Grass Beds & Oyster Bars, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Thursday, February 9, 2018.

Please also visit the SanibelFort MyersFlorida Fishing Report and Cuban Fishing sites.  Better water moving north of Sanibel up through Captiva & North Captiva.

Please click here to Book A Charter or call 239-472-8658 and here for Live Sanibel Traffic Cams.

SeaTrout, Grass Beds & Oyster Bars, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Monday, February 5, 2018.
SeaTrout, Grass Beds & Oyster Bars, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Monday, February 5, 2018.

Cynoscion nebulosus, the spotted seatrout, also known as speckled trout, is a common estuarine fish found in the southern United States along coasts of Gulf of Mexico and the coastal Atlantic Ocean from Maryland to Florida. These fish are also found in estuarine locations around Cape Breton Island of Nova Scotia, Canada.

Big Sea Trout, Grass Flats, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing. File Photo: Tuesday, May 16, 2017.
Big Sea Trout, Grass Flats, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing. File Photo: Tuesday, May 16, 2017.

While most of these fish are caught on shallow, grassy flats, spotted seatrout reside in virtually any inshore waters, from the surf of outside islands to far up coastal rivers, where they often come for shelter during cold weather. Contrary to its name, the spotted seatrout is not a member of the trout family (Salmonidae), but of the drum family (Sciaenidae). It is popular for commercial and especially recreational fishing in coastal waters of the southeastern United States. Adults reach 19-32 inches in length and 3-15 pounds in weight.

Big Sea Trout, Captiva Grass Flats, June 13, Sanibel & Captiva Islands & Fort Myers Charters & Fishing Guide Service.
Big Sea Trout, Captiva Grass Flats, June 13, Sanibel & Captiva Islands & Fort Myers Charters & Fishing Guide Service.

Spotted seatrout live in the top of the water column and are most numerous along the coasts of the southeastern states, such as Texas, Louisiana, Alabama, Mississippi, Georgia, and Florida. They are also common along the coasts of North and South Carolina and Virginia. Estuarine coasts are prime settlement areas. They are uncommonly seen north of Delaware Bay and along the coast of Cape Cod, Massachusetts.

SeaTrout, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Tuesday, December 26, 2017.
SeaTrout, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Tuesday, December 26, 2017.

Spotted seatrout is the common name endorsed by the American Fisheries Society. However, this fish has many other common names, including speckled trout, speck, speckles, spec, truite gris (Louisiana French), trucha de mar (Mexican Spanish), spotted weakfish, spotted seateague, southern seateague, salmon, salmon trout, simon trout, winter trout, seatrout, Nosferatu fish, and black trout. Particularly large ones are nicknamed gator trout.[1]

Big Seatrout caught on Sanibel & Captiva charters

The spotted seatrout has prominent canine teeth. Like other fish of the family Sciaenidae, it has an elongated, soft dorsal fin with scales; it is separated from the spinous dorsal fin by a deep notch. It usually has two anal spines and the lateral line extends to the tip of the caudal fin. The back has distinct spots scattered on it, including on the dorsal and caudal fins. Unlike some other members of the family Sciaenidae, the spotted seatrout does not have any chin barbels. In stained water, this fish’s background may take on a golden hue. Its shape and coloration is reminiscent of a brown trout. This fish is closely related to the weakfishCynoscion regalis.

Big Sea Trout, Inshore, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Monday, April 4, 2016 ~ #Sanibel #Captiva.
Big Sea Trout, Inshore, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Monday, April 4, 2016 ~ #Sanibel #Captiva.

The average size of spotted seatrout is 0.5-1.0 kg (1-2 lb), but in most areas fish up to 2.5 kg (5 lb) are fairly common. Fish weighing 3.5-4.5 kg (8-10 lb) are rare. The world record is 7.9 kg (17 lb 7 oz).

Small trout eat large amounts of shrimp and other crustaceans. As they grow larger, their diets shift toward fish, the larger, the better. Studies in Texas and Mississippi show that really big trout strongly prefer to feed on mullet; a large trout will find the largest mullet it can handle and try to swallow it. Often the mullet is half or two-thirds as large as the trout.[2]”  Please see more information here.

Please click here to Book A Charter or call 239-472-8658 and here for Live Sanibel Traffic Cams.  Sunday, February 11, SeaTrout, Grass Flats & Oyster Bars, click here for College Of Fishing Hats & Apparel.

We’re located in Castaways Marina, Santiva, Sanibel Island, just before the Blind Pass bridge to Captiva Island.

Big Sea Trout, Grass Flats, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Wednesday, 12-23-15 ~ #Sanibel #Captiva.
Big Sea Trout, Grass Flats, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Wednesday, 12-23-15 ~ #Sanibel #Captiva.

After a fierce storm, Turner Beach, the beach adjoining the Pass, is frequently covered with a bounty of shells from Olives to Fighting Whelks to the more common Conchs. The fishing is also renowned with sharks in the summer, tailing redfish on the bayside flats and snook under and off the Blind Pass bridge. Because Turner Beach faces Westward, the sunsets are spectacular and a popular viewing point for residents and visitors alike.

Sea Trout, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Saturday, April 2, 2016 ~ #Sanibel #Captiva.
Sea Trout, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Saturday, April 2, 2016 ~ #Sanibel #Captiva.

And you can like us on Facebook.

Fair winds and following seas,

Captain Joey Burnsed ~ please click calendar at the upper right or call 239-472-8658 to book a Sanibel & Captiva Islands, Boca Grande or Fort Myers fishing guide trip or shelling charter.

Sea Trout, Grass Beds, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Saturday, March 12, 2016 ~ #Sanibel #Captiva.
Sea Trout, Grass Beds, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Saturday, March 12, 2016 ~ #Sanibel #Captiva.

Captiva Fishing, Snook!

Snook, Passes, Docks,, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Saturday, February 10, 2018.
Snook, Passes, Docks, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Saturday, February 10, 2018.

Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, February 10, 2018: Snook.

CaptivaRentals.org: Avoid VRBO Fees. Rent Directly From Local Homeowners.Captiva Fishing Report,  Sanibel Island Fishing Charters, Saturday, February 10: Snook, Passes, Docks, Catch & Release; water quality in relatively good shape; (Caloosahatchee: no/little freshwater runoff impact right now; Red Tide Report, impact minimal, broken up and largely dispersed); more fishing reports from other areas and Captains below.

Saturday, February 10, Sanibel Island Fishing Charters: Snook, Oyster Bars, Catch & Release.  Please also visit the SanibelFort MyersFlorida Fishing Report and Cuban Fishing sites.  Better water moving north of Sanibel up through Captiva & North Captiva.

Snook, Blind Pass, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Saturday, February 10, 2018.
Snook, Blind Pass, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Saturday, February 10, 2018.

Please also visit the SanibelFort MyersFlorida Fishing Report and Cuban Fishing sites.  Better water moving north of Sanibel up through Captiva & North Captiva.

Please click here to Book A Charter or call 239-472-8658 and here for Live Sanibel Traffic Cams.

Tim, Snook Fishing, Redfish Pass, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Thursday, December 14, 2017.

“The common snook (Centropomus undecimalis) is a species of marine fish in the family Centropomidae of the order Perciformes. The common snook is also known as the sergeant fish or robalo. It was originally assigned to the sciaenid genus Sciaena; Sciaena undecimradiatus and Centropomus undecimradiatus are obsolete synonyms for the species.

 One of the largest snooksCentropomus undecimalis grows to a maximum overall length of 140 centimeters (4.6 ft) but common length is 50 centimeters (1.6 ft).The IGFA world record is 24.32 kg (53 lb 10 oz) caught in Parismina Ranch, Costa Rica by an angler named Rafael Montalvo.[1][2] Of typical centropomid form, it possesses drab coloration except for a distinctive black lateral line. It can also possess bright yellow pelvic and caudal fins, especially during the spawn.[3]
Captain Joey, Snook, Redfish Pass, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Thursday, December 14, 2017.
Captain Joey, Snook, Redfish Pass, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Thursday, December 14, 2017.

Centropomus undecimalis is widespread throughout the tropical waters of the western Atlantic Ocean from the coast of the North Carolina to Brazil including the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean Sea.[17]

Fingers O’Bannon Invitational Memorial Snook Tournament, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island [File Photo: Saturday, April 29, 2017].
Fingers O’Bannon Invitational Memorial Snook Tournament, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island [File Photo: Saturday, April 29, 2017].
Many[who?] believe that snook originated in Central America and that changes in the earth’s climate are what brought the snook to Florida. It is believed that during a great warming trend after the Ice Age, snook moved northward along the Mexico shoreline. They followed the perimeter of the Gulf of Mexico, down the west coast of Florida and up the east coast. There are massive snook in Central America, although they seem to look a little different because of the weather and water quality but besides that, they are the same.

Big Snook, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Monday, October 2, 2017.
Big Snook, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Monday, October 2, 2017.

There are no restrictions in most of Central America on the size or quantity of snook one can keep, consequently, many locals have been keeping and killing these massive snook for quite a while.[18] Occurring in shallow coastal waters (up to 20 meters (66 ft) depth), estuaries, and lagoons, the fish often enters fresh water. It is carnivorous, with a diet dominated by smaller fishes, and crustaceans such as shrimp, and occasionally crabs.[19]”  Please see more information here.

Snook, Tide Changes, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Monday, October 23, 2017.
Snook, Tide Changes, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Monday, October 23, 2017.

Saturday, February 10, Sanibel Island Fishing Charters: Snook, Oyster Bars, Catch & Release.  Please also visit the SanibelFort MyersFlorida Fishing Report and Cuban Fishing sites.  Better water moving north of Sanibel up through Captiva & North Captiva.

We’re located in Castaways Marina, Santiva, Sanibel Island, just before the Blind Pass bridge to Captiva Island.

Snook, Blind Pass, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Thursday, October 12, 2017, [File Photo: Friday, September 22, 2017].
Snook, Blind Pass, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Thursday, October 12, 2017, [File Photo: Friday, September 22, 2017].
After a fierce storm, Turner Beach, the beach adjoining the Pass, is frequently covered with a bounty of shells from Olives to Fighting Whelks to the more common Conchs. The fishing is also renowned for sharks in the summer, tailing redfish on the bayside flats and snook under and off the Blind Pass bridge. Because Turner Beach faces Westward, the sunsets are spectacular and a popular viewing point for residents and visitors alike.

Snook, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Tuesday, August 29, 2017.
Snook, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Tuesday, August 29, 2017.

Please like us on Facebook!

Fair winds and following seas,

Captain Joey Burnsed ~ please click calendar at the upper left or call 239-472-8658 to book a Sanibel & Captiva Islands, Boca Grande or Fort Myers fishing guide trip or shelling charter.

Snook, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Saturday, November 18, [File Photo -Thursday, May 18, 2017]. Snook, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Saturday, November 18, [File Photo -Thursday, May 18, 2017].

Captiva Fishing, Redfish!

Redfish, Oyster Bars, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Friday, February 9, 2018.
Redfish, Oyster Bars, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Friday, February 9, 2018.

Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, February  9, 2018: Redfish.

CaptivaRentals.org: Avoid VRBO Fees. Rent Directly From Local Homeowners.

Captiva Fishing Report,  Sanibel Island Fishing Charters, Friday, February 9: Redfish, Oyster Bars, Catch & Release; water quality in relatively good shape; (Caloosahatchee: no/little freshwater runoff impact right now; Red Tide Report, impact minimal, broken up and largely dispersed); more fishing reports from other areas and Captains below.

Friday, February 9, Sanibel Island Fishing Charters: Redfish, Oyster Bars, Catch & Release.  Please also visit the SanibelFort MyersFlorida Fishing Report and Cuban Fishing sites.  Better water moving north of Sanibel up through Captiva & North Captiva.

Please click here to Book A Charter or call 239-472-8658 and here for Live Sanibel Traffic Cams.

Redfish, Warmer, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Tuesday, January 16, 2017.
Redfish, Warmer, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Tuesday, January 16, 2017.

“The red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus), also known as channel bassredfishspottail bass, or simply red, is a game fish found in the Atlantic Ocean from Massachusetts to Florida and in the Gulf of Mexico from Florida to northern Mexico.[1] It is the only species in the genus Sciaenops.

The red drum is related to the black drum (Pogonias cromis), and the two species are often found in close proximity to each other; they can interbreed and form a robust hybrid, and younger fish are often indistinguishable in flavor.[2]

Redfish, Very Cold, Hiding In The Mangroves, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Friday, January 5, 2017.
Redfish, Very Cold, Hiding In The Mangroves, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Friday, January 5, 2017.

Red drum are a dark red color on the back, which fades into white on the belly. The red drum has a characteristic eyespot near the tail and is somewhat streamlined. Three-year-old red drum typically weigh 6-8 lb. The largest red drum on record weighed just over 94 lb and was caught in 1984 on Hatteras Island. Red drum and black drum both make a croaking or drumming sound when distressed.

The most distinguishing mark on the red drum is one large black spot on the upper part of the tail base. Having multiple spots is not uncommon for this fish, but having no spots is extremely rare. As the fish with multiple spots grow older, they seem to lose their excess spots. Scientists believe that the black spot near their tail helps fool predators into attacking the red drum’s tail instead of its head, allowing the red drum to escape.[3]

Redfish, Oyster Bars, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Satuday, August 19, 2017. File Photo.
Redfish, Oyster Bars, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Saturday, August 19, 2017. File Photo.

The red drum uses its senses of sight and touch, and its downturned mouth, to locate forage on the bottom through vacuuming or biting. On the top and middle of the water column, it uses changes in the light that might look like food. In the summer and fall, adult red drum feed on crabsshrimp, and mullet; in the spring and winter, adults primarily feed on menhaden, mullet, pinfishsea robinlizardfishspotAtlantic croaker, and mud minnows.

Redfish, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Tuesday, September 13, 2016
Redfish, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Tuesday, September 13, 2016

Red drum naturally occur along the southern Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico coasts of Louisiana, Texas, Alabama, Mississippi, and Florida. Aquaculture activities involving them occur around the world.[4] Immature red drum prefer grass marsh areas of bays and estuaries when available. Both younger mature red drum (3-6 years of age) and bull red drum prefer rocky outcroppings including jetties and manmade structures, such as oil rigs and bridge posts. Around this type of structure, they are found throughout the water column.”  Please see more information here.

Redfish, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Saturday, August 20, 2016.
Redfish, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Saturday, August 20, 2016.

Please click here to Book A Charter or call 239-472-8658 and here for Live Sanibel Traffic Cams.  Friday, February 9, Redfish, Grass Flats & Oyster Bars, click here for College Of Fishing Hats & Apparel.

More Redfish , Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Tuesday, May 3, 2016.
More Redfish, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Tuesday, May 3, 2016.

After a fierce storm, Turner Beach, the beach adjoining the Pass, is frequently covered with a bounty of shells from Olives to Fighting Whelks to the more common Conchs. The fishing is also renowned for sharks in the summer, tailing redfish on the bayside flats and snook under and off the Blind Pass bridge. Because Turner Beach faces Westward, the sunsets are spectacular and a popular viewing point for residents and visitors alike.

Big Redfish, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Wednesday, 11-11-15 ~ #Sanibel #Captiva.
Big Redfish, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Wednesday, 11-11-15 ~ #Sanibel #Captiva.

We would appreciate if you like us on Facebook.

Fair winds and following seas,

Captain Joey Burnsed ~ please click calendar at the upper right or call 239-472-8658 to book a Sanibel & Captiva Islands, Boca Grande or Fort Myers fishing guide trip or shelling charter.

Redfish, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Saturday, November 4, 2017, [File Photo - Saturday, 10-31-15] .
Redfish, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Saturday, November 4, 2017, [File Photo – Saturday, 10-31-15].

Captiva Fishing, SeaTrout!

Big SeaTrout, Grass Beds & Oyster Bars, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Thursday, February 9, 2018.
Big SeaTrout, Grass Beds & Oyster Bars, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Thursday, February 9, 2018.

Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, February 8, 2018: SeaTrout!

CaptivaRentals.org: Avoid VRBO Fees. Rent Directly From Local Homeowners.Captiva Fishing Report,  Sanibel Island Fishing Charters, Thursday, February 8: SeaTrout, Grass Flats, Catch & Release; water quality in relatively good shape; (Caloosahatchee: no/little freshwater runoff impact right now; Red Tide Report, impact minimal, broken up and largely dispersed); more fishing reports from other areas and Captains below.

Thursday, February 8, Sanibel Island Fishing Charters: SeaTrout, Grass Flats & Oyster Bars, Catch & Release.  Please also visit the SanibelFort MyersFlorida Fishing Report and Cuban Fishing sites.  Better water moving north of Sanibel up through Captiva & North Captiva.

SeaTrout, Grass Beds & Oyster Bars, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Monday, February 5, 2018.
SeaTrout, Grass Beds & Oyster Bars, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Monday, February 5, 2018.

Please also visit the SanibelFort MyersFlorida Fishing Report and Cuban Fishing sites.  Better water moving north of Sanibel up through Captiva & North Captiva.

Please click here to Book A Charter or call 239-472-8658 and here for Live Sanibel Traffic Cams.

SeaTrout, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Tuesday, December 26, 2017.
SeaTrout, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Tuesday, December 26, 2017.

Cynoscion nebulosus, the spotted seatrout, also known as speckled trout, is a common estuarine fish found in the southern United States along coasts of Gulf of Mexico and the coastal Atlantic Ocean from Maryland to Florida. These fish are also found in estuarine locations around Cape Breton Island of Nova Scotia, Canada.

Big Sea Trout, Grass Flats, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing. File Photo: Tuesday, May 16, 2017.
Big Sea Trout, Grass Flats, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing. File Photo: Tuesday, May 16, 2017.

While most of these fish are caught on shallow, grassy flats, spotted seatrout reside in virtually any inshore waters, from the surf of outside islands to far up coastal rivers, where they often come for shelter during cold weather. Contrary to its name, the spotted seatrout is not a member of the trout family (Salmonidae), but of the drum family (Sciaenidae). It is popular for commercial and especially recreational fishing in coastal waters of the southeastern United States. Adults reach 19-32 inches in length and 3-15 pounds in weight.

Big Sea Trout, Captiva Grass Flats, June 13, Sanibel & Captiva Islands & Fort Myers Charters & Fishing Guide Service.
Big Sea Trout, Captiva Grass Flats, June 13, Sanibel & Captiva Islands & Fort Myers Charters & Fishing Guide Service.

Spotted seatrout live in the top of the water column and are most numerous along the coasts of the southeastern states, such as Texas, Louisiana, Alabama, Mississippi, Georgia, and Florida. They are also common along the coasts of North and South Carolina and Virginia. Estuarine coasts are prime settlement areas. They are uncommonly seen north of Delaware Bay and along the coast of Cape Cod, Massachusetts.

Big Sea Trout on Sanibel & Captiva fishing charters. March 12, 2012
Big Sea Trout on Sanibel & Captiva fishing charters. March 12, 2012

Spotted seatrout is the common name endorsed by the American Fisheries Society. However, this fish has many other common names, including speckled trout, speck, speckles, spec, truite gris (Louisiana French), trucha de mar (Mexican Spanish), spotted weakfish, spotted seateague, southern seateague, salmon, salmon trout, simon trout, winter trout, seatrout, Nosferatu fish, and black trout. Particularly large ones are nicknamed gator trout.[1]

Big Seatrout caught on Sanibel & Captiva charters

The spotted seatrout has prominent canine teeth. Like other fish of the family Sciaenidae, it has an elongated, soft dorsal fin with scales; it is separated from the spinous dorsal fin by a deep notch. It usually has two anal spines and the lateral line extends to the tip of the caudal fin. The back has distinct spots scattered on it, including on the dorsal and caudal fins. Unlike some other members of the family Sciaenidae, the spotted seatrout does not have any chin barbels. In stained water, this fish’s background may take on a golden hue. Its shape and coloration is reminiscent of a brown trout. This fish is closely related to the weakfishCynoscion regalis.

Big Sea Trout, Inshore, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Monday, April 4, 2016 ~ #Sanibel #Captiva.
Big Sea Trout, Inshore, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Monday, April 4, 2016 ~ #Sanibel #Captiva.

The average size of spotted seatrout is 0.5-1.0 kg (1-2 lb), but in most areas fish up to 2.5 kg (5 lb) are fairly common. Fish weighing 3.5-4.5 kg (8-10 lb) are rare. The world record is 7.9 kg (17 lb 7 oz).

Small trout eat large amounts of shrimp and other crustaceans. As they grow larger, their diets shift toward fish, the larger, the better. Studies in Texas and Mississippi show that really big trout strongly prefer to feed on mullet; a large trout will find the largest mullet it can handle and try to swallow it. Often the mullet is half or two-thirds as large as the trout.[2]”  Please see more information here.

Please click here to Book A Charter or call 239-472-8658 and here for Live Sanibel Traffic Cams.  Thursday, February 8, SeaTrout, Grass Flats & Oyster Bars, click here for College Of Fishing Hats & Apparel.

We’re located in Castaways Marina, Santiva, Sanibel Island, just before the Blind Pass bridge to Captiva Island.

Big Sea Trout, Grass Flats, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Wednesday, 12-23-15 ~ #Sanibel #Captiva.
Big Sea Trout, Grass Flats, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Wednesday, 12-23-15 ~ #Sanibel #Captiva.

After a fierce storm, Turner Beach, the beach adjoining the Pass, is frequently covered with a bounty of shells from Olives to Fighting Whelks to the more common Conchs. The fishing is also renowned with sharks in the summer, tailing redfish on the bayside flats and snook under and off the Blind Pass bridge. Because Turner Beach faces Westward, the sunsets are spectacular and a popular viewing point for residents and visitors alike.

Sea Trout, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Saturday, April 2, 2016 ~ #Sanibel #Captiva.
Sea Trout, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Saturday, April 2, 2016 ~ #Sanibel #Captiva.

And you can like us on Facebook.

Fair winds and following seas,

Captain Joey Burnsed ~ please click calendar at the upper right or call 239-472-8658 to book a Sanibel & Captiva Islands, Boca Grande or Fort Myers fishing guide trip or shelling charter.

Sea Trout, Grass Beds, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Saturday, March 12, 2016 ~ #Sanibel #Captiva.
Sea Trout, Grass Beds, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Saturday, March 12, 2016 ~ #Sanibel #Captiva.

Captiva Fishing, Porkfish & Sheepshead!

Porkfish & Sheepshead, Offshore, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Wednesday, February 7, 2018.
Porkfish & Sheepshead, Offshore, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Wednesday, February 7, 2018.

Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, February 7, 2018: Porkfish & Sheepshead!

CaptivaRentals.org: Avoid VRBO Fees. Rent Directly From Local Homeowners.Captiva Fishing Report,  Sanibel Island Fishing Charters, Wednesday, February 7: Porkfish & Sheepshead, Structure, Catch & Release; water quality in relatively good shape; (Caloosahatchee: no/little freshwater runoff impact right now; Red Tide Report, impact minimal, broken up and largely dispersed); more fishing reports from other areas and Captains below.

Wednesday, February 7, Sanibel Island Fishing Charters: Porkfish & Sheepshead, Near-offshore, Catch & Release.  Please also visit the SanibelFort MyersFlorida Fishing Report and Cuban Fishing sites.  Better water moving north of Sanibel up through Captiva & North Captiva.

Porkfish, Offshore, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Tuesday, February 6, 2018.
Porkfish, Offshore, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Tuesday, February 6, 2018.

Please also visit the SanibelFort MyersFlorida Fishing Report and Cuban Fishing sites.  Better water moving north of Sanibel up through Captiva & North Captiva.

Please click here to Book A Charter or call 239-472-8658 and here for Live Sanibel Traffic Cams.

Porkfish

“Anisotremus virginicus  – This small fish gets its name from the grunting noise it makes by grinding its teeth together like other grunts do. It has a tall, flat body, with yellow and blue-silver stripes and two black bars running downwards over its eyes and just behind its cheeks. Yellow also highlights its face and fins, including its deeply forked caudal (tail) fin. This nocturnal schooling fish can grow to 15 inches long and 2 pounds but usually is found much smaller. In the ocean, it is curious towards humans, and it is a popular public aquarium fish.

Porkfish, Chuck, Offshore, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Tuesday, February 6, 2018.
Porkfish, Chuck, Offshore, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Tuesday, February 6, 2018.

Order – Perciformes
Family – Haemulidae
Genus – Anisotremus
Species – virginicus

Common Names

English language common names are porkfish, Atlantic porkfish, and paragrate grunt. Other common names include arroz con coco (Spanish), bandera spano (Papiamento), bonakanaal (Papiamento), burro catalina (Spanish), canario (Spanish), catalineata (Spanish), kuroobidai (Japanese), lippu rondeau (French), luszczyk wirginski (Polish), palriot (French), roncador-listado-americano (Portuguese), rondeau (French), salema (Portuguese), spaansevlag (Dutch), and svinfisk (Norwegian/Swedish).

Importance to Humans

Porkfish are of minor commercial fisheries value, however they are considered a good gamefish. Human consumption of the flesh of porkfish has been linked to ciguatera poisoning. Specimens are also collected for display in public show aquaria. In its natural habitat, porkfish are easily approached by divers.

Porkfish, Offshore, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Sunday, November 27, 2016.
Porkfish, Offshore, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Sunday, November 27, 2016.

Conservation

The porkfish is not listed as endangered or vulnerable with the World Conservation Union (IUCN). The IUCN is a global union of states, governmental agencies, and non-governmental organizations in a partnership that assesses the conservation status of species.

More Porkfish, Offshore, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Tuesday, February 6, 2018.
More Porkfish, Offshore, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Tuesday, February 6, 2018.

Geographical Distribution

Porkfish occur in the western Atlantic Ocean from Florida south to Brazil, including the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean Sea as well as the Bahamas. It has also been introduced to waters off Bermuda.

Habitat

Inhabiting shallow inshore waters over reefs and rocky bottoms, the porkfish is found at depths of 6-65 feet (2-20 m). It is nocturnal and often travels in large schools, occasionally swimming with white grunts. Porkfish make a grunting sound, common to all grunts, by rubbing their teeth together.

Porkfish, 1-14-15, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing & Fort Myers Fishing Charters & Guide Service.
Porkfish, 1-14-15, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing & Fort Myers Fishing Charters & Guide Service.

Biology

Distinctive Features
The porkfish is a deep-bodied grunt with a blunt snout and thick lips. It has a higher dorsal profile than most other grunts. The caudal fin is notched. The mouth is small and positioned low on the head.

Coloration
The body has yellow and silvery-blue stripes, and two black bars. One bar runs diagonally from above the eye to the mouth while the other is more vertical, beginning at the anterior edge of the dorsal fin to the base of the pectoral fin. The fins are yellow. Juvenile porkfish have no black bars, but instead have a large dark blotch near the base of the caudal fin. Two black stripes run horizontally through the midbody and back. The head is a brilliant yellow.

The porkfish is the only grunt occurring in the Atlantic Ocean with this yellow coloration and two black stripes. It is closely related to the burrito grunt (Anisotremus interruptus) from the Pacific Ocean. This pair is referred to as germinate species, believed to have been separated millions of years ago by the isthmus of Panama.

Porkfish Fishing, Offshore, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Tuesday, February 6, 2018.
Porkfish Fishing, Offshore, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Tuesday, February 6, 2018.

Size, Age, and Growth
Porkfish reach a maximum length of 15 inches (38 cm) and weight of 2 pounds (9 g). This fish commonly weighs only 4 ounces (113 g).

Dentition
Although the porkfish is a grunt, it lacks canines on the jaws and vomer teeth. Teeth are located on the pharyngeal bone of the jaw.

Food Habits
Invertebrates such as mollusks, echinoderms, crustaceans, and worms are preyed upon by nocturnally feeding adult porkfish. Juvenile porkfish pick parasites from the skin and scales of other species of fish, and are considered “cleaners”.

Porkfish, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Tuesday, February 6, 2018. Photo Courtesy Of Creative Commons, www.bbmexplorer.com.
Porkfish, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Tuesday, February 6, 2018. Photo Courtesy Of Creative Commons, www.bbmexplorer.com.

Reproduction
There is very little known about spawning and larval development of the porkfish. The larvae are similar in appearance to other sparids, but have a distinctive caudal fin spot. The second dorsal and anal fins are the first of the fins to begin development, a common pattern among perciform fishes.

Parasites
Parasites of the porkfish include cestode larvae found in the gills and copepods found within the operculum. A dinoflagellate, Oodinium ocellatum, has been observed in the kidney and internal tissues of this fish.

Porkfish, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Tuesday, February 6, 2018. Photo Courtesy Of Creative Commons, https://www.flickr.com/photos/chriskarrer/.
Porkfish, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Tuesday, February 6, 2018. Photo Courtesy Of Creative Commons, https://www.flickr.com/photos/chriskarrer/.

Predators
Snappers, groupers, sharks and other large piscivores are potential predators of the porkfish.

Taxonomy

This fish was originally named Sparus virginicus in 1758 by Carl Linnaeus, a Swedish naturalist. It was later renamed Anisotremus virginicus (Linnaeus 1758), the currently accepted scientific name. The genus name, Anisotremus, is derived from the Greek “anisos” meaning unequal and “trema” / “-atos” meaning hole. There are no known synonyms used in previous scientific literature referring to this fish.”  Source:  University Of Florida.

Grunt-Porkfish.jpg


Image Credit: FWC

Grunt, Porkfish

Scientific name: Anisotremus virginicus (Linnaeus, 1758)

Common name: Porkfish

Species Codes for Trip Ticket Reporting:
Food and Bait Code: 151 – Grunts *
Marine Life Code: 609 – Grunt, porkfish

License and Endorsements Required for Commercial Harvest:
SPL – Saltwater Products License
RS – Restricted Species Endorsement
M – Marine Life Endorsement

* These are unofficial designations, please see Florida Administrative Code Chapter 68B for specifics, https://www.flrules.org/.

Porkfish, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Tuesday, February 6, 2018. Photo Courtesy Of Creative Commons, https://www.flickr.com/photos/hisgett/.
Porkfish, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Tuesday, February 6, 2018. Photo Courtesy Of Creative Commons, https://www.flickr.com/photos/hisgett/.

Please click here to Book A Charter or call 239-472-8658 and here for Live Sanibel Traffic Cams. Wednesday, February 7, Sanibel Island Fishing Charters: Porkfish & Sheepshead, Near-offshore, Catch & Release; click here for College Of Fishing Hats & Apparel.

We’re located in Castaways Marina, Santiva, Sanibel Island, just before the Blind Pass bridge to Captiva Island.

After a fierce storm, Turner Beach, the beach adjoining the Pass, is frequently covered with a bounty of shells from Olives to Fighting Whelks to the more common Conchs. The fishing is also renowned with sharks in the summer, tailing redfish on the bayside flats and snook under and off the Blind Pass bridge. Because Turner Beach faces Westward, the sunsets are spectacular and a popular viewing point for residents and visitors alike.

 And you can like us on Facebook.

 

Porkfish, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Tuesday, February 6, 2018. Photo Courtesy Of Creative Commons, https://www.flickr.com/photos/lizbrooks/.
Porkfish, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Tuesday, February 6, 2018. Photo Courtesy Of Creative Commons, https://www.flickr.com/photos/lizbrooks/.

Fair winds and following seas,

Captain Joey Burnsed ~ please click calendar at the upper right or call 239-472-8658 to book a Sanibel & Captiva Islands, Boca Grande or Fort Myers fishing guide trip or shelling charter.

Porkfish, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Tuesday, February 6, 2018. Photo Courtesy Of Creative Commons, https://www.flickr.com/photos/by-ken/.
Porkfish, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Tuesday, February 6, 2018. Photo Courtesy Of Creative Commons, https://www.flickr.com/photos/by-ken/.

Captiva Fishing, Porkfish!

Porkfish, Offshore, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Tuesday, February 6, 2018.
Porkfish, Offshore, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Tuesday, February 6, 2018.

Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, February 6, 2018: Porkfish!

CaptivaRentals.org: Avoid VRBO Fees. Rent Directly From Local Homeowners.Captiva Fishing Report,  Sanibel Island Fishing Charters, Tuesday, February 6: Porkfish & Sheepshead, Structure, Catch & Release; water quality in relatively good shape; (Caloosahatchee: no/little freshwater runoff impact right now; Red Tide Report, impact minimal, broken up and largely dispersed); more fishing reports from other areas and Captains below.

Tuesday, February 6, Sanibel Island Fishing Charters: Porkfish & Sheepshead, Near-offshore, Catch & Release.  Please also visit the SanibelFort MyersFlorida Fishing Report and Cuban Fishing sites.  Better water moving north of Sanibel up through Captiva & North Captiva.

Porkfish, Chuck, Offshore, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Tuesday, February 6, 2018.
Porkfish, Chuck, Offshore, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Tuesday, February 6, 2018.

Please also visit the SanibelFort MyersFlorida Fishing Report and Cuban Fishing sites.  Better water moving north of Sanibel up through Captiva & North Captiva.

Please click here to Book A Charter or call 239-472-8658 and here for Live Sanibel Traffic Cams.

Porkfish

“Anisotremus virginicus  – This small fish gets its name from the grunting noise it makes by grinding its teeth together like other grunts do. It has a tall, flat body, with yellow and blue-silver stripes and two black bars running downwards over its eyes and just behind its cheeks. Yellow also highlights its face and fins, including its deeply forked caudal (tail) fin. This nocturnal schooling fish can grow to 15 inches long and 2 pounds but usually is found much smaller. In the ocean, it is curious towards humans, and it is a popular public aquarium fish.

More Porkfish, Offshore, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Tuesday, February 6, 2018.
More Porkfish, Offshore, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Tuesday, February 6, 2018.

Order – Perciformes
Family – Haemulidae
Genus – Anisotremus
Species – virginicus

Common Names

English language common names are porkfish, Atlantic porkfish, and paragrate grunt. Other common names include arroz con coco (Spanish), bandera spano (Papiamento), bonakanaal (Papiamento), burro catalina (Spanish), canario (Spanish), catalineata (Spanish), kuroobidai (Japanese), lippu rondeau (French), luszczyk wirginski (Polish), palriot (French), roncador-listado-americano (Portuguese), rondeau (French), salema (Portuguese), spaansevlag (Dutch), and svinfisk (Norwegian/Swedish).

Importance to Humans

Porkfish are of minor commercial fisheries value, however they are considered a good gamefish. Human consumption of the flesh of porkfish has been linked to ciguatera poisoning. Specimens are also collected for display in public show aquaria. In its natural habitat, porkfish are easily approached by divers.

Porkfish, Offshore, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Sunday, November 27, 2016.
Porkfish, Offshore, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Sunday, November 27, 2016.

Conservation

The porkfish is not listed as endangered or vulnerable with the World Conservation Union (IUCN). The IUCN is a global union of states, governmental agencies, and non-governmental organizations in a partnership that assesses the conservation status of species.

Geographical Distribution

Porkfish occur in the western Atlantic Ocean from Florida south to Brazil, including the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean Sea as well as the Bahamas. It has also been introduced to waters off Bermuda.

Habitat

Inhabiting shallow inshore waters over reefs and rocky bottoms, the porkfish is found at depths of 6-65 feet (2-20 m). It is nocturnal and often travels in large schools, occasionally swimming with white grunts. Porkfish make a grunting sound, common to all grunts, by rubbing their teeth together.

Porkfish, 1-14-15, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing & Fort Myers Fishing Charters & Guide Service.
Porkfish, 1-14-15, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing & Fort Myers Fishing Charters & Guide Service.

Biology

Distinctive Features
The porkfish is a deep-bodied grunt with a blunt snout and thick lips. It has a higher dorsal profile than most other grunts. The caudal fin is notched. The mouth is small and positioned low on the head.

Coloration
The body has yellow and silvery-blue stripes, and two black bars. One bar runs diagonally from above the eye to the mouth while the other is more vertical, beginning at the anterior edge of the dorsal fin to the base of the pectoral fin. The fins are yellow. Juvenile porkfish have no black bars, but instead have a large dark blotch near the base of the caudal fin. Two black stripes run horizontally through the midbody and back. The head is a brilliant yellow.

The porkfish is the only grunt occurring in the Atlantic Ocean with this yellow coloration and two black stripes. It is closely related to the burrito grunt (Anisotremus interruptus) from the Pacific Ocean. This pair is referred to as germinate species, believed to have been separated millions of years ago by the isthmus of Panama.

Porkfish Fishing, Offshore, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Tuesday, February 6, 2018.
Porkfish Fishing, Offshore, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Tuesday, February 6, 2018.

Size, Age, and Growth
Porkfish reach a maximum length of 15 inches (38 cm) and weight of 2 pounds (9 g). This fish commonly weighs only 4 ounces (113 g).

Dentition
Although the porkfish is a grunt, it lacks canines on the jaws and vomer teeth. Teeth are located on the pharyngeal bone of the jaw.

Food Habits
Invertebrates such as mollusks, echinoderms, crustaceans, and worms are preyed upon by nocturnally feeding adult porkfish. Juvenile porkfish pick parasites from the skin and scales of other species of fish, and are considered “cleaners”.

Porkfish, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Tuesday, February 6, 2018. Photo Courtesy Of Creative Commons, www.bbmexplorer.com.
Porkfish, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Tuesday, February 6, 2018. Photo Courtesy Of Creative Commons, www.bbmexplorer.com.

Reproduction
There is very little known about spawning and larval development of the porkfish. The larvae are similar in appearance to other sparids, but have a distinctive caudal fin spot. The second dorsal and anal fins are the first of the fins to begin development, a common pattern among perciform fishes.

Parasites
Parasites of the porkfish include cestode larvae found in the gills and copepods found within the operculum. A dinoflagellate, Oodinium ocellatum, has been observed in the kidney and internal tissues of this fish.

Porkfish, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Tuesday, February 6, 2018. Photo Courtesy Of Creative Commons, https://www.flickr.com/photos/chriskarrer/.
Porkfish, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Tuesday, February 6, 2018. Photo Courtesy Of Creative Commons, https://www.flickr.com/photos/chriskarrer/.

Predators
Snappers, groupers, sharks and other large piscivores are potential predators of the porkfish.

Taxonomy

This fish was originally named Sparus virginicus in 1758 by Carl Linnaeus, a Swedish naturalist. It was later renamed Anisotremus virginicus (Linnaeus 1758), the currently accepted scientific name. The genus name, Anisotremus, is derived from the Greek “anisos” meaning unequal and “trema” / “-atos” meaning hole. There are no known synonyms used in previous scientific literature referring to this fish.”  Source:  University Of Florida.

Grunt-Porkfish.jpg


Image Credit: FWC

Grunt, Porkfish

Scientific name: Anisotremus virginicus (Linnaeus, 1758)

Common name: Porkfish

Species Codes for Trip Ticket Reporting:
Food and Bait Code: 151 – Grunts *
Marine Life Code: 609 – Grunt, porkfish

License and Endorsements Required for Commercial Harvest:
SPL – Saltwater Products License
RS – Restricted Species Endorsement
M – Marine Life Endorsement

* These are unofficial designations, please see Florida Administrative Code Chapter 68B for specifics, https://www.flrules.org/.

Porkfish, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Tuesday, February 6, 2018. Photo Courtesy Of Creative Commons, https://www.flickr.com/photos/hisgett/.
Porkfish, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Tuesday, February 6, 2018. Photo Courtesy Of Creative Commons, https://www.flickr.com/photos/hisgett/.

Please click here to Book A Charter or call 239-472-8658 and here for Live Sanibel Traffic Cams. Tuesday, February 6, Sanibel Island Fishing Charters: Porkfish & Sheepshead, Near-offshore, Catch & Release; click here for College Of Fishing Hats & Apparel.

We’re located in Castaways Marina, Santiva, Sanibel Island, just before the Blind Pass bridge to Captiva Island.

After a fierce storm, Turner Beach, the beach adjoining the Pass, is frequently covered with a bounty of shells from Olives to Fighting Whelks to the more common Conchs. The fishing is also renowned with sharks in the summer, tailing redfish on the bayside flats and snook under and off the Blind Pass bridge. Because Turner Beach faces Westward, the sunsets are spectacular and a popular viewing point for residents and visitors alike.

 And you can like us on Facebook.

 

Porkfish, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Tuesday, February 6, 2018. Photo Courtesy Of Creative Commons, https://www.flickr.com/photos/lizbrooks/.
Porkfish, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Tuesday, February 6, 2018. Photo Courtesy Of Creative Commons, https://www.flickr.com/photos/lizbrooks/.

Fair winds and following seas,

Captain Joey Burnsed ~ please click calendar at the upper right or call 239-472-8658 to book a Sanibel & Captiva Islands, Boca Grande or Fort Myers fishing guide trip or shelling charter.

Porkfish, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Tuesday, February 6, 2018. Photo Courtesy Of Creative Commons, https://www.flickr.com/photos/by-ken/.
Porkfish, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Tuesday, February 6, 2018. Photo Courtesy Of Creative Commons, https://www.flickr.com/photos/by-ken/.

Captiva Fishing, SeaTrout!

SeaTrout, Grass Beds & Oyster Bars, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Monday, February 5, 2018.
SeaTrout, Grass Beds & Oyster Bars, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Monday, February 5, 2018.

Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, February 5, 2018: SeaTrout!

CaptivaRentals.org: Avoid VRBO Fees. Rent Directly From Local Homeowners.Captiva Fishing Report,  Sanibel Island Fishing Charters, Monday, February 5: SeaTrout, Grass Beds, Catch & Release; water quality in relatively good shape; (Caloosahatchee: no/little freshwater runoff impact right now; Red Tide Report, impact minimal, broken up and largely dispersed); more fishing reports from other areas and Captains below.

Monday, February 5, Sanibel Island Fishing Charters: SeaTrout, Grass Flats & Oyster Bars, Catch & Release.  Please also visit the SanibelFort MyersFlorida Fishing Report and Cuban Fishing sites.  Better water moving north of Sanibel up through Captiva & North Captiva.

Charlie, Big Sea Trout, Sanibel & Captiva Islands & Fort Myers Charters & Fishing Guide Service, Monday, February 5, 2018, [File Photo: 3-3-14].
Charlie, Big Sea Trout, Sanibel & Captiva Islands & Fort Myers Charters & Fishing Guide Service, Monday, February 5, 2018, [File Photo: 3-3-14].
Please also visit the SanibelFort MyersFlorida Fishing Report and Cuban Fishing sites.  Better water moving north of Sanibel up through Captiva & North Captiva.

Please click here to Book A Charter or call 239-472-8658 and here for Live Sanibel Traffic Cams.

SeaTrout, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Tuesday, December 26, 2017.
SeaTrout, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Tuesday, December 26, 2017.

Cynoscion nebulosus, the spotted seatrout, also known as speckled trout, is a common estuarine fish found in the southern United States along coasts of Gulf of Mexico and the coastal Atlantic Ocean from Maryland to Florida. These fish are also found in estuarine locations around Cape Breton Island of Nova Scotia, Canada.

Big Sea Trout, Grass Flats, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing. File Photo: Tuesday, May 16, 2017.
Big Sea Trout, Grass Flats, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing. File Photo: Tuesday, May 16, 2017.

While most of these fish are caught on shallow, grassy flats, spotted seatrout reside in virtually any inshore waters, from the surf of outside islands to far up coastal rivers, where they often come for shelter during cold weather. Contrary to its name, the spotted seatrout is not a member of the trout family (Salmonidae), but of the drum family (Sciaenidae). It is popular for commercial and especially recreational fishing in coastal waters of the southeastern United States. Adults reach 19-32 inches in length and 3-15 pounds in weight.

Big Sea Trout, Captiva Grass Flats, June 13, Sanibel & Captiva Islands & Fort Myers Charters & Fishing Guide Service.
Big Sea Trout, Captiva Grass Flats, June 13, Sanibel & Captiva Islands & Fort Myers Charters & Fishing Guide Service.

Spotted seatrout live in the top of the water column and are most numerous along the coasts of the southeastern states, such as Texas, Louisiana, Alabama, Mississippi, Georgia, and Florida. They are also common along the coasts of North and South Carolina and Virginia. Estuarine coasts are prime settlement areas. They are uncommonly seen north of Delaware Bay and along the coast of Cape Cod, Massachusetts.

Big Sea Trout on Sanibel & Captiva fishing charters. March 12, 2012
Big Sea Trout on Sanibel & Captiva fishing charters. March 12, 2012

Spotted seatrout is the common name endorsed by the American Fisheries Society. However, this fish has many other common names, including speckled trout, speck, speckles, spec, truite gris (Louisiana French), trucha de mar (Mexican Spanish), spotted weakfish, spotted seateague, southern seateague, salmon, salmon trout, simon trout, winter trout, seatrout, Nosferatu fish, and black trout. Particularly large ones are nicknamed gator trout.[1]

Big Seatrout caught on Sanibel & Captiva charters

The spotted seatrout has prominent canine teeth. Like other fish of the family Sciaenidae, it has an elongated, soft dorsal fin with scales; it is separated from the spinous dorsal fin by a deep notch. It usually has two anal spines and the lateral line extends to the tip of the caudal fin. The back has distinct spots scattered on it, including on the dorsal and caudal fins. Unlike some other members of the family Sciaenidae, the spotted seatrout does not have any chin barbels. In stained water, this fish’s background may take on a golden hue. Its shape and coloration is reminiscent of a brown trout. This fish is closely related to the weakfishCynoscion regalis.

Big Sea Trout, Inshore, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Monday, April 4, 2016 ~ #Sanibel #Captiva.
Big Sea Trout, Inshore, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Monday, April 4, 2016 ~ #Sanibel #Captiva.

The average size of spotted seatrout is 0.5-1.0 kg (1-2 lb), but in most areas fish up to 2.5 kg (5 lb) are fairly common. Fish weighing 3.5-4.5 kg (8-10 lb) are rare. The world record is 7.9 kg (17 lb 7 oz).

Small trout eat large amounts of shrimp and other crustaceans. As they grow larger, their diets shift toward fish, the larger, the better. Studies in Texas and Mississippi show that really big trout strongly prefer to feed on mullet; a large trout will find the largest mullet it can handle and try to swallow it. Often the mullet is half or two-thirds as large as the trout.[2]”  Please see more information here.

Please click here to Book A Charter or call 239-472-8658 and here for Live Sanibel Traffic Cams.  SeaTrout, Grass Flats & Oyster Bars, click here for College Of Fishing Hats & Apparel.

We’re located in Castaways Marina, Santiva, Sanibel Island, just before the Blind Pass bridge to Captiva Island.

Big Sea Trout, Grass Flats, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Wednesday, 12-23-15 ~ #Sanibel #Captiva.
Big Sea Trout, Grass Flats, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Wednesday, 12-23-15 ~ #Sanibel #Captiva.

After a fierce storm, Turner Beach, the beach adjoining the Pass, is frequently covered with a bounty of shells from Olives to Fighting Whelks to the more common Conchs. The fishing is also renowned with sharks in the summer, tailing redfish on the bayside flats and snook under and off the Blind Pass bridge. Because Turner Beach faces Westward, the sunsets are spectacular and a popular viewing point for residents and visitors alike.

Sea Trout, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Saturday, April 2, 2016 ~ #Sanibel #Captiva.
Sea Trout, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Saturday, April 2, 2016 ~ #Sanibel #Captiva.

And you can like us on Facebook.

Fair winds and following seas,

Captain Joey Burnsed ~ please click calendar at the upper right or call 239-472-8658 to book a Sanibel & Captiva Islands, Boca Grande or Fort Myers fishing guide trip or shelling charter.

Sea Trout, Grass Beds, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Saturday, March 12, 2016 ~ #Sanibel #Captiva.
Sea Trout, Grass Beds, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Saturday, March 12, 2016 ~ #Sanibel #Captiva.

Captiva Fishing, Grouper!

More Grouper, Near Offshore Structure, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Sunday, February 4, 2018.
More Grouper, Near Offshore Structure, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Sunday, February 4, 2018.

Sanibel Fishing, Captiva Fishing, February 4, 2018: Grouper.

Sanibel Island Fishing Charters

CaptivaRentals.org: Avoid VRBO Fees. Rent Directly From Local Homeowners.Captiva Fishing Report,  Sanibel Island Fishing Charters, Sunday, February 4: More Grouper, Near Offshore Structure, Catch & Release; water quality in relatively good shape; (Caloosahatchee: no/little freshwater runoff impact right now; Red Tide Report, impact minimal, broken up and largely dispersed); more fishing reports from other areas and Captains below.

Sunday, February 4, Sanibel Island Fishing Charters: Grouper & Tripletail, Offshore Structure, Catch & Release.  Please also visit the SanibelFort MyersFlorida Fishing Report and Cuban Fishing sites.  Better water moving north of Sanibel up through Captiva & North Captiva.

Grouper, Near Offshore Structure, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Thursday, February 1, 2018.
Grouper, Near Offshore Structure, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Thursday, February 1, 2018.
Captiva Island Fishing Charters

For Captiva Island Fishing Charters, we’re located in Castaways Marina, Santiva, Sanibel Island, just before the Blind Pass bridge to Captiva Island.

Please click here to Book A Charter or call 239-472-8658 and here for Live Sanibel Traffic Cams.

Grouper, Structure, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Wednesday, January 24, 2018.
Grouper, Structure, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Wednesday, January 24, 2018.

Mycteroperca microlepis (the gaggag groupervelvet rockfish or charcoal belly) is a species of grouper from warmer parts of the West Atlantic, including the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico. It is a drab, mottled-gray fish lacking the distinguishing features of most other groupers. Its pattern of markings resemble the box-shaped spots of the black grouper. It lacks the streamer-points on the tail fin that scamp (Mycteroperca phenax) and yellowmouth grouper (M. interstitialis) have, and lacks yellow coloration around the mouth.

Two Grouper, Very Cold, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Friday, January 20, 2018.

Ten- to 20-pound (5- to 10-kg) fish are common. The world record is 80 lb 6 oz (36.45 kg). The gag grouper is a bottom feeder and is often caught by fishermen seeking bottom-dwelling species, such as snappers. Its flaky white meat is considered quite delicious.

More Grouper And Snapper, Near Offshore Structure, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Monday, January 15, 2018.

Members of this species are known to be protogynous hermaphrodites, schooling in harems with the most aggressive and largest females shifting sex to male, probably as a result of behavioral triggers, when no male is available. Commercial and sport fishing have created tremendous selective pressures against the largest animals, typically male, restricting the reproductive capacity of the entire breeding population.

Grouper And Snapper, Near Offshore Structure, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Saturday, January 13, 2018.
Grouper And Snapper, Near Offshore Structure, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Saturday, January 13, 2018.

Recently, a small closure in the Gulf of Mexico was established to provide this and other species a refuge from commercial fishing pressure, however, these data are highly in dispute and are currently being challenged for inaccuracies. They are found in areas of a hard or consolidated substrate, and use structural features, such as ledges, rocks, and coral reefs (as well as artificial reefs, such as wrecks and sunken barges) as their habitats.”  Please see more information here.

Grouper In The Passes, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Thursday, December 21, 2017, [File Photo - Tuesday, September 19, 2017].
Grouper In The Passes, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Thursday, December 21, 2017, [File Photo – Tuesday, September 19, 2017].
Please click here to Book A Charter or call 239-472-8658 and here for Live Sanibel Traffic Cams.  More Grouper & Tripletail, click here for College Of Fishing Hats & Apparel.

We’re located in Castaways Marina, Santiva, Sanibel Island, just before the Blind Pass bridge to Captiva Island.

Grouper, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Thursday, November 16, 2017, [File Photo - Thursday, August 10, 2017].
Grouper, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Thursday, November 16,
2017, [File Photo – Thursday, August 10, 2017].
After a fierce storm, Turner Beach, the beach adjoining the Pass, is frequently covered with a bounty of shells from Olives to Fighting Whelks to the more common Conchs. The fishing is also renowned for sharks in the summer, tailing redfish on the bayside flats and snook under and off the Blind Pass bridge. Because Turner Beach faces Westward, the sunsets are spectacular and a popular viewing point for residents and visitors alike.

Grouper, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Thursday, December 21, 2017 [File Photo - Tuesday, June 20, 2017].
Grouper, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Thursday, December 21, 2017 [File Photo – Tuesday, June 20, 2017].
And you can like us on Facebook.

Fair winds and following seas,

Captain Joey Burnsed ~ please click calendar at the upper left or call 239-472-8658 to book a Sanibel & Captiva Islands, Boca Grande or Fort Myers fishing guide trip or shelling charter.

Grouper, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Sunday, March 19, 2017.
Grouper, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Sunday, March 19, 2017.

Captiva Island, Florida