Category Archives: Bluefish

Captiva Fishing, Bluefish, May 10, 2017

Bluefish Fishing, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island,Wednesday, May 10, 2017.
Bluefish Fishing, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Wednesday, May 10, 2017.

Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Bluefish.

Sanibel & Captiva Rentals
Sanibel & Captiva Rentals

Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Captiva Island, Wednesday, May 10: Bluefish are caught year round in the Gulf of Mexico, are great fighters and a great bait fish;  for more fishing reports and photos from our other Captains’ boats, please also visit our SanibelFort MyersFlorida Fishing Report and Cuban Fishing sites. 

Please click here to Book A Charter or call 239-472-8658 and here for Live Sanibel Traffic CamsClick here for College Of Fishing Hats & Apparel.  Click here for latest Red Tide Reportbetter water moving north of Sanibel up through Captiva & North Captiva.

We’re located at Castaways Marina, Santiva, Sanibel Island, just before the Blind Pass bridge to Captiva Island.

Bluefish, Inshore, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Monday, 12-21-15 ~ #Sanibel #Captiva.
Bluefish, Inshore, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Monday, 12-21-15 ~ #Sanibel #Captiva.

“The bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix) is the only extant species of the family Pomatomidae. It is a marine pelagic fish found around the world in temperate and subtropical waters, except for the northern Pacific Ocean. Bluefish are known as tailor in Australia,[2] shad on the east coast of South Africa, and elf on the western North American coast[citation needed]. Other common names are blue, chopper, and anchoa.[3] It is a popular gamefish.

Bluefish, 5-11-14, Sanibel & Captiva Islands & Fort Myers Charters & Fishing Guide Service.
Bluefish, 5-11-14, Sanibel & Captiva Islands & Fort Myers Charters & Fishing Guide Service.

The bluefish is a moderately proportioned fish, with a broad, forked tail. The spiny first dorsal fin is normally folded back in a groove, as are its pectoral fins. Coloration is a grayish blue-green dorsally, fading to white on the lower sides and belly. Its single row of teeth in each jaw is uniform in size, knife-edged, and sharp. Bluefish commonly range in size from seven-inch (18-cm) “snappers” to much larger, sometimes weighing as much as 40 lb (18 kg), though fish heavier than 20 lb (9 kg) are exceptional.

Bluefish, 7-24-14, Redfish Pass, North Captiva, Sanibel & Captiva Islands & Fort Myers Charters & Fishing Guide Service.
Bluefish, 7-24-14, Redfish Pass, North Captiva, Sanibel & Captiva Islands & Fort Myers Charters & Fishing Guide Service.

Bluefish are widely distributed around the world in tropical and subtropical waters. They are found in pelagic waters on much of the continental shelves along eastern America (though not between south Florida and northern South America), Africa, the Mediterranean and Black Seas (and during migration in between), Southeast Asia, and Australia. They are found in a variety of coastal habitats: above the continental shelf, in energetic waters near surf beaches, or by rock headlands.[4] They also enter estuaries and inhabit brackish waters.[5][6][7] Periodically, they leave the coasts and migrate in schools through open waters.[8][9]

Bluefish, Inshore, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Thursday, 12-24-15 ~ #Sanibel #Captiva.
Bluefish, Inshore, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Thursday, 12-24-15 ~ #Sanibel #Captiva.

Along the U.S. East Coast, bluefish are found off Florida in the winter. By April, they have disappeared, heading north. By June, they may be found off Massachusetts; in years of high abundance, stragglers may be found as far north as Nova Scotia. By October, they leave the waters north of New York City, heading south (whereas some bluefish, perhaps less migratory,[10][11] are present in the Gulf of Mexico throughout the year). In a similar pattern overall, the economically significant population that spawns in Europe’s Black Sea migrates south through Istanbul (Bosphorus, Sea of Marmara, Dardanelles, Aegean Sea) and on toward Turkey’s Mediterranean coast in the autumn for the cold season.[12] Along the South African coast and environs, movement patterns are roughly in parallel.[13]

Captiva Fishing, Bluefish, 4-6-15, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing & Fort Myers Fishing Charters & Guide Service.
Captiva Fishing, Bluefish, 4-6-15, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing & Fort Myers Fishing Charters & Guide Service.

Adult bluefish are typically between 20 and 60 cm long, with a maximum reported size of 120 cm and 14 kg. They reproduce during spring and summer and can live up to 9 years.[8][9] Bluefish fry are zooplankton and are largely at the mercy of currents.[14][15] Spent bluefish have been found off east central Florida, migrating north. As with most marine fish, their spawning habits are not well known. In the western side of the North Atlantic, at least two populations occur, separated by Cape Hatteras in North Carolina. The Gulf Stream can carry fry spawned to the south of Cape Hatteras to the north, and eddies can spin off, carrying them into populations found off the coast of the mid-Atlantic, and the New England states.[16]

Bluefish, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island,Wednesday, May 10, 2017.
Bluefish, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island,Wednesday, May 10, 2017.

Adult bluefish are strong and aggressive and live in loose groups. They are fast swimmers which prey on schools of forage fish and continue attacking them in feeding frenzies even after they appear to have eaten their fill.[8][9] Depending on area and season, they favor menhaden and other sardine-like fish (Clupeidae), jacks (Scombridae), weakfish (Sciaenidae), grunts (Haemulidae), striped anchovies (Engraulidae), shrimp, and squid. They are cannibalistic and can destroy their own young.[17] Bluefish sometimes chase bait through the surf zone, attacking schools in very shallow water, churning the water like a washing machine. This behavior is sometimes referred to as a “bluefish blitz”.

In turn, bluefish are preyed upon by larger predators at all stages of their lifecycle. As juveniles, they fall victim to a wide variety of oceanic predators, including striped bass, larger bluefish, fluke (summer flounder), weakfish, tuna, sharks, rays, and dolphins. As adults, bluefish are taken by tuna, sharks, billfish, seals, sea lions, dolphins, porpoises, and many other species.

Bluefish, Thanksgiving Fishing, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Thursday, November 24, 2016.
Bluefish, Thanksgiving Fishing, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Thursday, November 24, 2016.

Bluefish should be handled with caution due to their ability to snap at unwary hands. Fishermen have been severely bitten, and wearing gloves can help. Wading or swimming among feeding bluefish schools can be dangerous.[18] In July 2006, a seven-year-old girl was attacked on a beach, near the Spanish town of Alicante, allegedly by a bluefish.[19]

Bluefish are highly sought-after sportfish (and restaurant fish in some places) that had been widely overfished across the world’s fisheries.[24] Restrictions set forth by management organizations have somewhat helped the species’ population stabilize. In the U.S., specifically along the seaboard of the middle Atlantic states, bluefish were at unhealthy levels in the late 1990s, but management resulted in this stocks being fully rebuilt by 2007.[25] In other parts of the world, public awareness efforts, such as bluefish festivals, combined with catch limits, may be having positive effects in reducing the stress on the regional stocks.[26] Some of these efforts are regionally controversial.[13]”  More background here.

More Bluefish, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Tuesday, December 6, 2016.
More Bluefish, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Tuesday, December 6, 2016.

We’re big advocates of catch and release, particularly for snook, but pretty much for most species.  Only take what you are going to eat, and a lot of fish are better off as sportfish, even if they are in season.  Our motto is let ‘em get bigger and catch ‘em again!

Please click calendar at upper right or call 239-472-8658 to book a charter.

Whether you’re a longtime customer who has fished with us for many years or a first-time customer, expert fisherman or just a family with young children out to catch fish and have fun, you are going to enjoy being out in the boat with Hank and me!  We greatly appreciate your friendship and business!

More Bluefish Fishing, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island,Wednesday, May 10, 2017.
More Bluefish Fishing, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Wednesday, May 10, 2017.

 

If you had a good time fishing with Captain Joey Burnsed on a Sanibel & Captiva charter, please post an “excellent” review on Google PlacesTripAdvisorYelp, or Facebook!  If you had any issues at all with your charter, please let us know immediately and we’ll do everything we can to make it right!  Huge thanks for doing this!

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Fair winds and following seas,

Captain Joey Burnsed ~ please click calendar at the upper left or call 239-472-8658 to book a Sanibel & Captiva Islands, Boca Grande or Fort Myers fishing guide trip or shelling charter.