Category Archives: Blacknose Shark

Captiva Fishing, Blacknose Shark, April 11, 2017

Blacknose Shark, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Tuesday, April 11, 2017
Blacknose Shark, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Tuesday, April 11, 2017

Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Blacknose Shark!

Sanibel & Captiva Rentals
Sanibel & Captiva Rentals

Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Sanibel Island, Tuesday, April 11: Blacknose Sharks stealing the tarpon bait, catch & release; latest Red Tide Reportbetter water moving north of Sanibel up through Captiva & North Captiva.  Please click here to Book A Charter or call 239-472-8658.

We’re located at Castaways Marina, Santiva, Sanibel Island, just before the Blind Pass bridge to Captiva Island.

For more photos and/or fishing reports from our other Captains’ boats from other marinas, please also visit our SanibelFort MyersSeashell & ShellingFlorida Fishing Report and Cuban Fishing sites. Please check here for Live Sanibel Traffic CamsClick here for College Of Fishing Hats & Apparel.

Man Bites Shark, Blacknose Sharks, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Tuesday, June 28, 2016.
Man Bites Shark, Blacknose Sharks, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Tuesday, June 28, 2016.

The blacknose shark has a slender, streamlined body with a long, rounded snout and large eyes. There is a well-developed flap of skin in front of each nostril, defining the inflow and outflow openings. Twelve to 13 and 11 to 12 tooth rows occur on either side of the upper and lower jaws, respectively, with one or two teeth at the symphysis (middle). The teeth are triangular and oblique, with serrated edges; the upper teeth are stouter than the lower teeth. The five pairs of gill slits are short, measuring less a third the length of the first dorsal fin base.[6][8]

The first dorsal fin is small and somewhat sickle-shaped, with a pointed apex and a short, free, rear tip; its origin lies over the free rear tips of the pectoral fins. The second dorsal fin is relatively large, though still less than half the height of the first. No ridge is seen

Blacknose Shark, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Monday, July 18, 2016.
Blacknose Shark, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Monday, July 18, 2016.

between the dorsal fins. The pectoral fins are short and tapered.[8] The body is covered with overlapping dermal denticles that bear five to seven longitudinal ridges (three in very young individuals) leading to three to five marginal teeth.[6] The coloration is yellowish to greenish-gray or brown above and white to yellow below. A distinctive dark blotch at the tip of the snout is most obvious in young sharks. The tips of the second dorsal fin, upper caudal fin lobe, and sometimes the lower caudal fin lobe, are dark. Blacknose sharks are typically 1.3–1.4 m (4.3–4.6 ft) long and 10 kg (22 lb) in weight.[2][8] The maximum length and weight on record are 2.0 m (6.6 ft) and 18.9 kg (42 lb), respectively.[9]

Blacknose Shark, 6-19-14, Sanibel & Captiva Islands & Fort Myers Charters & Fishing Guide Service.
Blacknose Shark, 6-19-14, Sanibel & Captiva Islands & Fort Myers Charters & Fishing Guide Service.

A small, fast-swimming predator, the blacknose shark feeds primarily on small, bony fishes, including pinfish, croakers, porgies, anchovies, spiny boxfish, and porcupinefish, as well as on octopus and other cephalopods.[6] When competing for bait, their speed allows them to snatch food from larger sharks such as the Caribbean reef shark (C. perezi).[10][11] This species may form large schools that are sometimes associated with anchovies and mullet.[6] Blacknose sharks demonstrate a high degree of philopatry: both juveniles and adults have been documented returning to the same local area year after year.[12]

More Blacknose Sharks, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Wednesday, June 29, 2016.
More Blacknose Sharks, Catch & Release, Sanibel Fishing & Captiva Fishing, Wednesday, June 29, 2016.

Blacknose sharks are preyed upon by larger sharks,[6] and captives have been observed to perform an apparent threat display towards encroaching divers or newly introduced members of their species. The display consists of the shark hunching its back, lowering its pectoral fins, gaping its jaws, and swimming with an exaggerated side-to-side motion.[2][13]”  More background here.

We’re big advocates of catch and release, particularly for snook, but pretty much for most species.  Only take what you are going to eat, and a lot of fish are better off as sportfish, even if they are in season.  Our motto is let ‘em get bigger and catch ‘em again!

Please click calendar at upper right or call 239-472-8658 to book a charter.

Whether you’re a longtime customer who has fished with us for many years or a first-time customer, expert fisherman or just a family with young children out to catch fish and have fun, you are going to enjoy being out in the boat with Hank and me!  We greatly appreciate your friendship and business!

We grew up on Sanibel and Captiva fishing and shelling every day! It is what we know and do well!  If you had a good time fishing with Captain Joey Burnsed on a Sanibel & Captiva charter, please post an “excellent” review on Google PlacesTripAdvisorYelp, or Facebook!  If you had any issues at all with your charter, please let us know immediately and we’ll do everything we can to make it right!  Huge thanks for doing this!

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Fair winds and following seas,

Captain Joey Burnsed ~ please click calendar at the upper left or call 239-472-8658 to book a Sanibel & Captiva Islands, Boca Grande or Fort Myers fishing guide trip or shelling charter.